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  • only calorie counting

    Is calorie counting the only kind of diet that really works with diet pills? If I want them to work at their best, is this the kind that I should be picking or are there alternatives but the bottles just don't list them?

  • #2
    I think essentially it's calorie counting and exercise. Those diets really are the best if you want to lose the most weight and they work well with any diet pill in my opinion.

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    • #3
      I genuinely think it's a combo of calorie-counting and regular exercise (mixture of both cardio and strength training). The reason is that those are essentially the two things you need to do to lose weight, so this technique should work with any diet pill. From what I understand of APEX TX5, it will help to support these conventional weight loss efforts so it's easier for you to stick to controlling your calories an exercising.

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      • #4
        Calorie counting really is the one with the most science. But if you want to talk science, you can up the value of your calories by choosing whole foods over processed. For some reason that research hasn't found out yet, it's easier to lose weight eating whole foods than it is eating the exact same number of calories in processed foods!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by enviroTodd View Post
          Calorie counting really is the one with the most science. But if you want to talk science, you can up the value of your calories by choosing whole foods over processed. For some reason that research hasn't found out yet, it's easier to lose weight eating whole foods than it is eating the exact same number of calories in processed foods!
          Really? And they don't know why that is? Of course it makes sense that whole foods would be better for you than those that are processed, but I wonder what it is about the processed ones that make it harder to lose weight....I wonder if they do something wonky to your blood sugar levels and appetite so it sends the wrong kind of signals to your brain or maybe your body just doesn't process the stuff the same and stores too much of it as fat? This is really interesting!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by BabyButtons View Post

            Really? And they don't know why that is? Of course it makes sense that whole foods would be better for you than those that are processed, but I wonder what it is about the processed ones that make it harder to lose weight....I wonder if they do something wonky to your blood sugar levels and appetite so it sends the wrong kind of signals to your brain or maybe your body just doesn't process the stuff the same and stores too much of it as fat? This is really interesting!
            I hope they find that out, too. I found it extremely interesting. Here's the study in the Cell journal that published it: https://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism...131(19)30248-7 Here's an article about it on Consumer Reports that puts all that technical stuff into English: https://www.consumerreports.org/pack...r-weight-loss/

            They compared calories, fats, sugar, fiber and macronutrients and no matter what they compared, it was the whole foods that won out over the highly processed foods. There's something about processed foods that set back your weight loss efforts. To me, that says something about what those foods are (or aren't) doing in our bodies as a whole. Something we don't know about yet isn't working in our bodies in the same way as with whole foods. Nature likes to remind us that we're always hers.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by enviroTodd View Post

              I hope they find that out, too. I found it extremely interesting. Here's the study in the Cell journal that published it: https://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism...131(19)30248-7 Here's an article about it on Consumer Reports that puts all that technical stuff into English: https://www.consumerreports.org/pack...r-weight-loss/

              They compared calories, fats, sugar, fiber and macronutrients and no matter what they compared, it was the whole foods that won out over the highly processed foods. There's something about processed foods that set back your weight loss efforts. To me, that says something about what those foods are (or aren't) doing in our bodies as a whole. Something we don't know about yet isn't working in our bodies in the same way as with whole foods. Nature likes to remind us that we're always hers.
              She does at that! Good ol' mother nature is always the way to go and always the winner in the long run! Thank you for providing the links to the study. I'm very interested in reading about all this

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              • #8
                [QUOTE=enviroTodd;n44887]

                I hope they find that out, too. I found it extremely interesting. Here's the study in the Cell journal that published it: https://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism...131(19)30248-7 Here's an article about it on Consumer Reports that puts all that technical stuff into English: https://www.consumerreports.org/pack...r-weight-loss/

                They compared calories, fats, sugar, fiber and macronutrients and no matter what they compared, it was the whole foods that won out over the highly processed foods. There's something about processed foods that set back your weight loss efforts. To me, that says something about what those foods are (or aren't) doing in our bodies as a whole. Something we don't know about yet isn't working in our bodies in the same way as with whole foods. Nature likes to remind us that we're always hers.


                She does at that! Good ol' mother nature is always the way to go and always the winner in the long run! Thank you for providing the links to the study. I'm very interested in reading about all this

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by enviroTodd View Post

                  I hope they find that out, too. I found it extremely interesting. Here's the study in the Cell journal that published it: https://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism...131(19)30248-7 Here's an article about it on Consumer Reports that puts all that technical stuff into English: https://www.consumerreports.org/pack...r-weight-loss/

                  They compared calories, fats, sugar, fiber and macronutrients and no matter what they compared, it was the whole foods that won out over the highly processed foods. There's something about processed foods that set back your weight loss efforts. To me, that says something about what those foods are (or aren't) doing in our bodies as a whole. Something we don't know about yet isn't working in our bodies in the same way as with whole foods. Nature likes to remind us that we're always hers.
                  She does at that! Good ol' mother nature is always the way to go and always the winner in the long run! Thank you for providing the links to the study. I'm very interested in reading about all this

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    She does at that enviroTodd! Good ol' mother nature is always the way to go and always the winner in the long run! Thank you for providing the links to the study. I'm very interested in reading about all this

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by BabyButtons View Post
                      She does at that enviroTodd! Good ol' mother nature is always the way to go and always the winner in the long run! Thank you for providing the links to the study. I'm very interested in reading about all this
                      I'm learning that too, lately. I'm not against synthetic stuff, but the natural route is starting to have some benefits I didn't expect.

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